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Shocking Truth About Baby Food

In a recent article, the British Dental Association are calling for a change to be made to the surprising levels of sugar in some brands of baby food.

Baby food pouches have become very popular among parents as they provide a convenient grab and go approach. However a recent study has found that some popular branded baby pouches contain high levels of sugar, meaning that children could be getting hooked at an age as young as four months old.

Additionally, as the food can be eaten directly from the pouch, the contents are being left in contact with the teeth for even longer.

Research into 109 pouches found that:

  • Over a quarter contained more sugar by volume than Coca Cola. Infants as young as four months are marketed fruit-based pouches that contain the equivalent of upto 150% of the sugar levels of pop.
  • It appears that high end brands have higher levels of sugar than supermarket own brands, with Ella’s Kitchen being criticised.
  • Some products aimed at four month olds were tested and were found to contain upto two thirds of an adults recommended daily allowance.
  • WHO guidance recommends weaning from six months old, so no products should be marketed at four months plus, yet nearly 40% of the products examined were marketed at this age group.
  • Over two thirds of the products examined exceeded the 5g of sugar per 100ml threshold set for the sugar levy applied to drinks.

Experts say the level of sugar in these foods is a concern as it could lead to your child having a preference for sweeter foods throughout their life. This could lead to oral health problems, such as tooth decay, but also obesity.

The Best Food For Babies

Parents should look for single ingredient foods when their children are younger than six months. A child’s taste preferences are formed and solidified during their first year of life. Parents should avoid baby food that contains a mixture of fruits and vegetables as it can teach a child that vegetables only taste good when sweetened.